Coverart for item
The Resource Sustainability appraisal : a sourcebook and reference guide to international experience, Barry Dalal-Clayton and Barry Sadler with contributions from James Baines, Steve Bass, Annie Dufey, Maryanne Grieg-Gran, Emma Wilson

Sustainability appraisal : a sourcebook and reference guide to international experience, Barry Dalal-Clayton and Barry Sadler with contributions from James Baines, Steve Bass, Annie Dufey, Maryanne Grieg-Gran, Emma Wilson

Label
Sustainability appraisal : a sourcebook and reference guide to international experience
Title
Sustainability appraisal
Title remainder
a sourcebook and reference guide to international experience
Statement of responsibility
Barry Dalal-Clayton and Barry Sadler with contributions from James Baines, Steve Bass, Annie Dufey, Maryanne Grieg-Gran, Emma Wilson
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
DLC
Dewey number
338.9/27
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
HC79.E5
LC item number
D3189 2014
Literary form
non fiction
NAL call number
HC79.E5
NAL item number
D35 2014
Nature of contents
bibliography
Label
Sustainability appraisal : a sourcebook and reference guide to international experience, Barry Dalal-Clayton and Barry Sadler with contributions from James Baines, Steve Bass, Annie Dufey, Maryanne Grieg-Gran, Emma Wilson
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 719-790) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Machine generated contents note: pt. 1 Introduction and approaches to sustainability appraisal -- 1.Introduction -- 1.1.Brief definition and unpacking of terms -- 1.1.1.Sustainability appraisal as a policy instrument and vector for reform -- 1.2.Emerging demand for integrated sustainability-focused approaches -- 1.3.Purpose, rationale and scope: the what, why and how of the review -- 1.4.An initial framework for sustainability appraisal -- Note -- 2.A macro framework for sustainability appraisal: concepts, principles and perspectives -- 2.1.Introduction -- 2.2.Background: evolution of sustainable development in international law and policy -- 2.2.1.Early beginnings -- 2.2.2.Report of the World Commission on Environment and Development (1987) -- 2.2.3.The UN Conference on Environment and Development (1992) -- 2.2.4.UN Millennium Development Goals (2000) -- 2.2.5.The UN World Summit on Sustainable Development (2002) -- 2.2.6.Tallying the ledger --
  • Contents note continued: 2.2.7.The latest UN Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) -- 2.2.8.Sustainable development goals -- 2.3.Towards an operational understanding of sustainable development: perspectives on evaluation -- 2.3.1.The imperative for sustainability and the issue of limits to growth -- 2.3.1.1.Making the case for limits -- 2.3.1.2.Counter-arguments -- 2.3.1.3.The prevailing orthodoxy: managing risks and banking on technology -- 2.3.2.Key components of sustainable development and the conditions for sustainability -- 2.3.2.1.The Brundtland definition of sustainable development -- 2.3.2.2.Capital assets and their inter- and intra-generational transfer -- 2.3.2.3.System conditions for sustainability identified in The Natural Step -- 2.3.3.The governance of sustainable development and institutions for public policy-making -- 2.3.3.1.Themes and issues of sustainability governance -- 2.3.3.2.Multi-level governance -- 2.4.Sustainability as an integrated approach --
  • Contents note continued: 2.4.1.Different forms of integration -- 2.4.2.A closer look at the integration of the three pillars of sustainable development -- 2.5.Conclusion -- Notes -- 3.Integrated approaches to sustainability appraisal -- 3.1.A tri-partite approach to integrated, sustainability-focused decision-making -- 3.1.1.Time and space boundaries -- 3.1.2.A compass of sustainability guides and reference points -- 3.1.3.A systematic process of sustainability assessment -- 3.1.4.Rules of the game for process design and implementation -- 3.1.4.1.The framework of sustainability aims and principles -- 3.1.4.2.Core principles and requirements that will govern the assessment process -- 3.1.4.3.Objectives-led and effects-based sustainability criteria that will direct the assessment of effects -- 3.1.4.4.Trade-offs and decision-making -- 3.2.Micro-level integration (impact assessment) --
  • Contents note continued: 3.3.Meso-level integration (strategic) planning and policy mechanisms, with particular reference to sustainable development strategies and scenario planning -- 3.3.1.Sustainable development strategies -- 3.3.2.Scenario planning -- 3.4.Macro-level integration (progress accounting) -- 3.4.1.Ex post or retrospective approaches to measuring and analysing sustainability -- 3.4.1.1.Account-based approaches -- 3.4.1.2.Narrative assessments -- 3.4.1.3.Indicator-based assessments -- 3.4.1.4.An example of retrospective application -- 3.4.1.5.Deciding what to measure: a framework of parts and aims -- 3.5.Methods and tools for integration -- 3.5.1.Examples of tools for undertaking sustainability assessment -- 3.5.1.1.Assessing the sustainability of societal initiatives and proposing agendas for change (ASSIPAC) -- 3.5.1.2.Threshold 21 -- 3.5.1.3.Consistency analysis matrix for policy assessment -- 3.5.1.4.Sustainability test --
  • Contents note continued: 3.5.1.5.Questionnaire-based approaches -- 3.5.1.6.Toolkit approaches -- 3.5.1.7.Adaptive, participatory approaches -- 3.5.1.8.Global sector-wide approaches -- 3.5.1.9.Other approaches -- 3.6.Conclusion -- Notes -- pt. 2 Dimensions of sustainability -- 4.Environmental sustainability appraisal and assurance: concepts, approaches and applications -- 4.1.Introduction -- 4.2.Environmental sustainability in a full world: values, concepts and policies -- 4.2.1.Environmentalism and sustainable development: world-views and values of nature in a full world -- 4.2.2.International environmental law and policy -- 4.2.2.1.Status, scope and sustainability relevance of multilateral environmental agreements -- 4.2.2.2.The biodiversity and climate change conventions -- 4.2.2.3.MEA implementation and issues of compliance, enforcement and effectiveness -- 4.2.3.Scientific concepts, criteria and interpretations of environmental sustainability --
  • Contents note continued: 4.2.3.1.Environmental and Earth system science for sustainability -- 4.2.3.2.Conceptual models and propositions of global environmental sustainability -- 4.2.3.3.Frameworks and metrics of global environmental sustainability -- 4.2.3.4.Resilience and vulnerability of natural and socio-ecological systems -- 4.3.Macro-assessment of global and large-scale environmental change -- 4.3.1.Overview of the state of the global environment -- 4.3.2.Major issues and inter-linkages -- 4.3.2.1.Climate change -- 4.3.2.2.Loss of species, biodiversity and ecosystem services -- 4.3.2.3.Emerging risks and issues -- 4.3.3.Sustainability implications of global environmental change -- 4.4.Environmental assessment and management approaches and applications -- 4.4.1.Environmental mainstreaming: need and tools -- 4.4.2.EAM tools and approaches to environmental safeguarding -- 4.4.2.1.Environmental impact assessment and strategic environmental assessment --
  • Contents note continued: 4.4.2.2.Cumulative effects assessment and management (CEAM) -- 4.4.2.3.Environmental risk assessment -- 4.4.2.4.Integrated environmental/ecosystem assessment -- 4.4.2.5.Environmental management regimes and systems -- 4.4.3.Environmental assessment and management tools and approaches for environmental sustainability assurance -- 4.4.3.1.Specifying demand- and supply-side principles for strong sustainability -- 4.4.3.2.Strengthening EIA and SEA and other EAM tools as sustainability instruments -- 4.4.3.3.Ecosystems approach to maintaining critical natural capital and services -- 4.5.Conclusion -- Notes -- 5.Economics-based approaches to sustainability appraisal -- 5.1.Introduction -- 5.2.Background: entry points for an economic approach to sustainability analysis -- 5.3.Sustainability -- 5.3.1.The term `sustainability' -- 5.3.2.Economic sustainability in a narrow sense -- 5.3.3.Economic sustainability as a dimension of sustainable development --
  • Contents note continued: 5.3.4.Sustainability as non-declining human welfare -- 5.3.4.1.Natural capital: weak and strong sustainability -- 5.3.4.2.Other types of capital -- 5.4.Economic applications of sustainability assessment -- 5.5.Approaches to integrating economic variables with social and environmental variables -- 5.5.1.Approaches to integration in the estimation of impacts -- 5.5.1.1.Scope of integration -- 5.5.1.2.Methodological approaches and challenges -- 5.5.1.3.Simple methods -- 5.5.1.4.Complex methods -- 5.6.Evaluation and comparison: integration of economic, environmental and social variables -- 5.6.1.Assessment of projects -- 5.6.2.Assessment of policy -- 5.6.3.Macro-economic performance -- 5.6.3.1.Adjusted savings -- 5.6.3.2.Trade and trans-boundary movements of capital -- 5.6.3.3.Addressing the social dimension of sustainable development -- 5.7.Emergence of the green economy concept -- 5.8.Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- Notes --
  • Contents note continued: 6.Social dimensions of sustainability appraisal -- 6.1.Introduction -- 6.2.Organising concepts, values and principles -- 6.2.1.Scope and interpretation of social sustainability -- 6.2.1.1.Basic needs and social well-being -- 6.2.1.2.Equity: basic needs plus what else? -- 6.2.1.3.Social inclusion -- 6.2.1.4.Social capital -- 6.2.1.5.Empowerment -- 6.2.1.6.Security and resilience -- 6.2.2.International law and policy -- 6.2.3.The implementation gap and the role of international agencies -- 6.2.4.National policy frameworks -- 6.3.Retrospective assessments of trends and issues: global and national social appraisals -- 6.4.Status of social appraisal: tools and approaches -- 6.4.1.Social impact assessment (SIA) -- 6.4.1.1.Scope and purpose of SIA -- 6.4.1.2.SIA principles and guidelines -- 6.4.1.3.Steps in SIA -- 6.4.1.4.Methods and data -- 6.4.1.5.Integration with other impact assessments and sustainability concepts -- 6.4.2.Health impact assessment (HIA) --
  • Contents note continued: 6.4.2.1.Sustainability values and guiding principles of HIA -- 6.4.2.2.HIA procedure and methodology -- 6.4.2.3.HIA application and good practice -- 6.4.3.Human Rights Impact Assessment (HRLA) -- 6.4.4.Indigenous peoples and cultural assessment -- 6.4.5.Sustainable livelihoods framework -- 6.5.World Bank social appraisal tools -- 6.5.1.Poverty assessments -- 6.5.2.Poverty and social impact analysis (PSIA) -- 6.5.3.Gender analysis -- 6.5.4.Indigenous peoples' development planning -- 6.5.5.Resettlement -- 6.6.Public participation in decision-making -- 6.6.1.Types of public participation -- 6.7.Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- Notes -- pt. 3 National and international experience to date -- 7.Experience in the European Union and selected developed countries -- 7.1.The European Union and Europe-wide agenda -- 7.1.1.Legal and policy framework -- 7.1.1.1.Sustainable development in EU primary law -- 7.1.1.2.EU sustainable development policy and strategy --
  • Contents note continued: 7.1.2.(Integrated) impact assessment -- 7.1.2.1.Cornerstones and elements of approach -- 7.1.2.2.Initial phase of implementation (2002--2005) -- 7.1.2.3.Recent changes in guidance and oversight (2006--2011) -- 7.1.2.4.A final word on impact assessment as a sustainability tool -- 7.1.3.EC-funded research projects and training on impact assessment -- 7.1.4.The European Environmental Agency -- 7.2.The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) -- 7.3.Selected national experiences -- 7.3.1.Australia -- 7.3.1.1.Legal and policy background -- 7.3.1.2.Integrated assessment at the Commonwealth level -- 7.3.1.3.Application at the state level: Western Australia -- 7.3.1.4.The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) -- 7.3.2.Canada -- 7.3.2.1.Legal and policy background -- 7.3.2.2.Role and approach of the National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy --
  • Contents note continued: 7.3.2.3.Experience with federal sustainable development strategies -- 7.3.2.4.Impact assessment -- 7.3.2.5.Land use and resource planning related approaches -- 7.3.3.The Netherlands -- 7.3.3.1.National-level assessment -- 7.3.3.2.Provincial-level assessment -- 7.3.3.3.Municipal-level assessment -- 7.3.3.4.General framework for SA -- 7.3.4.New Zealand -- 7.3.4.1.Legal and policy background -- 7.3.4.2.RMA practice -- 7.3.5.Switzerland -- 7.3.6.The United Kingdom -- 7.3.6.1.Policy-level appraisal -- 7.3.6.2.Assessment of plans and programmes -- 7.3.6.3.New planning framework in England -- 7.3.7.The USA -- 7.4.Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- Notes -- 8.Experience in selected development cooperation agencies and developing countries -- 8.1.Introduction -- 8.2.Multilateral agencies -- 8.2.1.The African Development Bank (AfDB) -- 8.2.2.The Asian Development Bank (ADB) -- 8.2.2.1.Country environmental analyses -- 8.2.2.2.Strategic environmental assessment --
  • Contents note continued: 8.2.2.3.Safeguard policy statement -- 8.2.2.4.Sustainability reports -- 8.2.2.5.Environment-cum-economic planning -- 8.2.3.The Inter-American Development Bank -- 8.2.4.The International Finance Corporation and the World Bank -- 8.3.Bilateral agencies -- 8.3.1.Australia: Ausaid -- 8.3.2.Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) -- 8.3.3.The Netherlands -- 8.3.4.The Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (NORAD) -- 8.3.5.The Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida) -- 8.4.UN organisations -- 8.4.1.UNEP -- 8.4.2.UNDP -- 8.4.3.Poverty--Environment Initiative -- 8.5.Developing countries -- 8.5.1.Southern Africa -- 8.5.1.1.Southern African views on sustainable development and approaches to sustainability appraisal -- 8.5.1.2.Rossing uranium mine sustainability assessment, Namibia -- 8.5.2.South Africa -- 8.5.2.1.Introduction -- 8.5.2.2.Government initiatives -- 8.5.2.3.Provincial and local-level initiatives --
  • Contents note continued: 8.5.2.4.Private sector initiatives -- 8.5.2.5.Cape Action Plan for the Environment -- 8.5.2.6.Human settlement policy framework -- 8.5.3.Some examples of experience in other developing countries -- 8.6.Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- Notes -- pt. 4 Sustainability appraisal methodologies and their application -- 9.Natural resources and land use -- 9.1.Introduction -- 9.2.Background on key concepts and approaches -- 9.2.1.Linking global environmental issues and human needs -- 9.2.2.Land evaluation and land use planning -- 9.2.3.Cross-cutting concepts and approaches -- 9.2.3.1.Analysing the resource wealth of the poor -- 9.3.Global assessment and analysis of natural resource issues and links -- 9.4.Food and water security as fundamental challenges -- 9.4.1.Global food assessment and response planning -- 9.4.2.Global assessments of water trends and issues -- 9.4.3.Regional and trans-boundary assessment --
  • Contents note continued: 9.4.4.National- and sub-national water assessment: an example from the Netherlands -- 9.4.5.Towards hydropower sustainability assessment -- 9.5.Sustainable agriculture -- 9.5.1.Trends and issues -- 9.5.2.Policy responses to the impact of intensive farming -- 9.5.2.1.European approaches to policy reform -- 9.5.2.2.Sustainability assessment of farms -- 9.5.2.3.Inquiry into the sustainability of intensive farming, New Zealand -- 9.5.3.Sustainable agriculture and rural development, standards and certification in developing countries -- 9.6.Sustainable forestry management -- 9.6.1.Global assessments and trends -- 9.6.2.Assessing sustainable forest management -- 9.6.3.Intensive, commercial forestry -- 9.6.3.1.Regional Forest Agreement (RFA) process, Australia -- 9.6.3.2.Tool for sustainability impact assessment of the Forest Wood Chain (ToSIA) -- 9.7.Sustainable fisheries management -- 9.7.1.Issues and trends in fisheries -- 9.7.2.Global assessments --
  • Contents note continued: 9.7.3.Fisheries certification -- 9.7.4.Sustainable fisheries assessment and management -- 9.7.4.1.Sustainable fisheries assessment: Australian practice -- 9.7.5.Aquaculture as a sustainability issue -- 9.7.5.1.Assessments and audits of the impact of salmon farming in British Columbia -- 9.8.Conclusion -- Notes -- 10.Sustainability appraisal for business, industry and infrastructure development -- 10.1.Introduction -- 10.2.Key concepts and drivers -- 10.3.Sustainability norms and principles for business and industry -- 10.3.1.Industry member forums -- 10.3.2.Norms and standards aimed at regulation of business and industry -- 10.4.Key tools and approaches -- 10.4.1.Sustainability reporting -- 10.4.2.Triple bottom line assessment -- 10.4.3.Life cycle analysis (LCA) -- 10.4.4.Environmental accounting -- 10.4.5.Environmental or sustainability audit -- 10.4.6.Sustainability-Integrated Guidelines for Management (SIGMA) -- 10.4.7.The Natural Step --
  • Contents note continued: 10.4.8.Sustainable Project Appraisal Routine (SPeAR) -- 10.4.9.Anglo American's Socio-Economic Assessment Toolbox (SEAT) -- 10.4.10.Environmental sustainability assessment -- 10.4.11.Corporate sustainability assessment: the case of Crystal Flash, Michigan -- 10.4.12.Bp's Sustainability Assessment Model (SAM) -- 10.4.13.Bank Sarasin: sustainability assessment for investment -- 10.4.14.Dow Jones sustainability indexes and corporate sustainability assessments -- 10.4.15.UK Government: sustainability assessment of renewable energy projects -- 10.4.16.Sustainability assessment for small and medium-sized enterprises -- 10.5.Sectoral review processes -- 10.5.1.The Sustainable Paper Cycle Study -- 10.5.2.The Mining, Minerals and Sustainable Development (MMSD) project -- 10.5.3.Extractive Industries Review: a sustainability appraisal by any other name? -- 10.5.3.1.The EIR process: did it satisfy the requirements of a sustainability appraisal? --
  • Contents note continued: 10.5.4.World Commission on Dams: performance assessment of large dams -- 10.6.Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- Notes -- 11.Sustainable urban development -- 11.1.Introduction -- 11.2.Background: conceptual and policy frameworks -- 11.2.1.Urban growth in the developing and developed worlds -- 11.2.2.Some basic terms and concepts -- 11.2.3.Urban sustainability policies and strategies -- 11.2.3.1.Global policy agenda -- 11.2.3.2.EU strategies and policies -- 11.2.3.3.Development cooperation agency policies -- 11.2.3.4.National and state approaches -- 11.2.3.5.Local Agenda 21's and municipal activities -- 11.3.Global and comparative assessments of sustainability-related urban trends and conditions -- 11.3.1.Global dynamics and impacts of urban expansion -- 11.3.2.Cities as the new frontier in the struggle for sustainability -- 11.3.2.1.Cities in a Globalising World; Global Report on Human Settlements (2001) (UN-Habitat 2001) --
  • Contents note continued: 11.3.2.2.The Challenge of Slums; Global Report on Human Settlements (2003) (UN-Habitat 2003a) -- 11.3.2.3.State of the World's Cities Report, 2008--2009: Harmonious Cities (UN-Habitat 2008) -- 11.3.2.4.State of the World's Cities Report, 2010--11: Bridging the Urban Divide (2010) (UN-Habitat 2010) -- 11.3.2.5.State of the World's Cities Report, 2012--2013: Prosperity of Cities (UN-Habitat 2012) -- 11.3.3.Comparative rating of cities -- 11.3.3.1.Global ratings of liveable and hardship cities -- 11.3.3.2.National surveys -- 11.4.Assessing the external impacts of cities -- 11.4.1.Regional and peri-urban effects -- 11.4.1.1.Developing country issues and approaches -- 11.4.1.2.Developed country issues and approaches -- 11.4.2.Urban ecological footprints and resource metabolism -- 11.5.City and municipal-level approaches -- 11.5.1.Providing information, awareness-raising and toolkit approaches -- 11.5.2.Municipal sustainability assessment --
  • Contents note continued: 11.5.3.Approaches focusing on the built environment -- 11.5.3.1.Sustainability appraisal applied to government estates -- 11.5.4.Questionnaire, checklist and matrix approaches -- 11.5.5.Municipal environmental budgeting -- 11.6.Local and community-based planning initiatives to move towards sustainability -- 11.6.1.Citizen-based assessment -- 11.6.2.Campus sustainability assessments -- 11.6.3.Home sustainability assessment -- 11.7.Urban development and climate change -- 11.8.Conclusion -- Acknowledgement -- Notes -- 12.Trade liberalisation policies and sustainability measures -- 12.1.Introduction -- 12.2.Background on the international trade regime with particular reference to environment and sustainable development -- 12.2.1.The multilateral trade regime -- 12.2.2.Regional and bilateral free trade agreements -- 12.3.Current practice in SIA of trade policies -- 12.3.1.International organisations --
  • Contents note continued: 12.3.1.1.The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) -- 12.3.1.2.The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) -- 12.3.1.3.The Organisation of American States (OAS) -- 12.3.1.4.World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) -- 12.3.2.Other trade-related institutional initiatives -- 12.3.2.1.United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) -- 12.3.2.2.International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) -- 12.3.2.3.International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD) -- 12.3.3.National and supra-national approaches -- 12.3.3.1.The Canadian and US experience -- 12.3.3.2.North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation (NACEC) -- 12.3.3.3.The European Commission (EC) -- 12.3.4.Other approaches -- 12.4.Common elements and differences in the major approaches to trade SIA -- 12.4.1.Coverage of the environmental, social and economic dimensions of sustainable development -- 12.4.2.Coverage of trade measures --
  • Contents note continued: 12.4.3.Geographical coverage -- 12.4.4.Assessment procedures -- 12.4.5.Stakeholder participation and consultation -- 12.4.6.Timing -- 12.4.7.Scenarios -- 12.4.8.Assessment and valuation tools -- 12.4.9.Indicators -- 12.4.10.Significance criteria -- 12.5.Conclusion -- Acknowledgement -- Notes -- pt. 5 Where to from here? -- 13.Retrospect and prospect -- 13.1.The evolving agenda of sustainable development -- 13.1.1.A reality check: has development become more sustainable in practice? -- 13.1.2.A horizon check: what emerging trends challenge our current approach to sustainable development? -- 13.1.3.A strategy check: where should we now be focusing our energies in the `new era of challenges for sustainable development'? -- 13.2.The anatomy of sustainability appraisal: some concluding observations and second thoughts -- 13.2.1.How far have we progressed with sustainability appraisal? -- 13.2.2.Where do we go from here in process and practice? --
  • Contents note continued: 13.2.3.Building on what we have: some ways forward and some unresolved questions -- 13.2.4.Sustainability appraisal framework revisited -- Acknowledgement -- Notes
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
xlii, 810 pages:
Isbn
9781844073573
Isbn Type
(hardback : alk. paper)
Lccn
2013025673
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
  • (OCoLC)853664412
  • 2123775
  • (OCoLC)853664412
  • (OCoLC)ocn853664412
  • 2123775
Label
Sustainability appraisal : a sourcebook and reference guide to international experience, Barry Dalal-Clayton and Barry Sadler with contributions from James Baines, Steve Bass, Annie Dufey, Maryanne Grieg-Gran, Emma Wilson
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 719-790) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Machine generated contents note: pt. 1 Introduction and approaches to sustainability appraisal -- 1.Introduction -- 1.1.Brief definition and unpacking of terms -- 1.1.1.Sustainability appraisal as a policy instrument and vector for reform -- 1.2.Emerging demand for integrated sustainability-focused approaches -- 1.3.Purpose, rationale and scope: the what, why and how of the review -- 1.4.An initial framework for sustainability appraisal -- Note -- 2.A macro framework for sustainability appraisal: concepts, principles and perspectives -- 2.1.Introduction -- 2.2.Background: evolution of sustainable development in international law and policy -- 2.2.1.Early beginnings -- 2.2.2.Report of the World Commission on Environment and Development (1987) -- 2.2.3.The UN Conference on Environment and Development (1992) -- 2.2.4.UN Millennium Development Goals (2000) -- 2.2.5.The UN World Summit on Sustainable Development (2002) -- 2.2.6.Tallying the ledger --
  • Contents note continued: 2.2.7.The latest UN Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) -- 2.2.8.Sustainable development goals -- 2.3.Towards an operational understanding of sustainable development: perspectives on evaluation -- 2.3.1.The imperative for sustainability and the issue of limits to growth -- 2.3.1.1.Making the case for limits -- 2.3.1.2.Counter-arguments -- 2.3.1.3.The prevailing orthodoxy: managing risks and banking on technology -- 2.3.2.Key components of sustainable development and the conditions for sustainability -- 2.3.2.1.The Brundtland definition of sustainable development -- 2.3.2.2.Capital assets and their inter- and intra-generational transfer -- 2.3.2.3.System conditions for sustainability identified in The Natural Step -- 2.3.3.The governance of sustainable development and institutions for public policy-making -- 2.3.3.1.Themes and issues of sustainability governance -- 2.3.3.2.Multi-level governance -- 2.4.Sustainability as an integrated approach --
  • Contents note continued: 2.4.1.Different forms of integration -- 2.4.2.A closer look at the integration of the three pillars of sustainable development -- 2.5.Conclusion -- Notes -- 3.Integrated approaches to sustainability appraisal -- 3.1.A tri-partite approach to integrated, sustainability-focused decision-making -- 3.1.1.Time and space boundaries -- 3.1.2.A compass of sustainability guides and reference points -- 3.1.3.A systematic process of sustainability assessment -- 3.1.4.Rules of the game for process design and implementation -- 3.1.4.1.The framework of sustainability aims and principles -- 3.1.4.2.Core principles and requirements that will govern the assessment process -- 3.1.4.3.Objectives-led and effects-based sustainability criteria that will direct the assessment of effects -- 3.1.4.4.Trade-offs and decision-making -- 3.2.Micro-level integration (impact assessment) --
  • Contents note continued: 3.3.Meso-level integration (strategic) planning and policy mechanisms, with particular reference to sustainable development strategies and scenario planning -- 3.3.1.Sustainable development strategies -- 3.3.2.Scenario planning -- 3.4.Macro-level integration (progress accounting) -- 3.4.1.Ex post or retrospective approaches to measuring and analysing sustainability -- 3.4.1.1.Account-based approaches -- 3.4.1.2.Narrative assessments -- 3.4.1.3.Indicator-based assessments -- 3.4.1.4.An example of retrospective application -- 3.4.1.5.Deciding what to measure: a framework of parts and aims -- 3.5.Methods and tools for integration -- 3.5.1.Examples of tools for undertaking sustainability assessment -- 3.5.1.1.Assessing the sustainability of societal initiatives and proposing agendas for change (ASSIPAC) -- 3.5.1.2.Threshold 21 -- 3.5.1.3.Consistency analysis matrix for policy assessment -- 3.5.1.4.Sustainability test --
  • Contents note continued: 3.5.1.5.Questionnaire-based approaches -- 3.5.1.6.Toolkit approaches -- 3.5.1.7.Adaptive, participatory approaches -- 3.5.1.8.Global sector-wide approaches -- 3.5.1.9.Other approaches -- 3.6.Conclusion -- Notes -- pt. 2 Dimensions of sustainability -- 4.Environmental sustainability appraisal and assurance: concepts, approaches and applications -- 4.1.Introduction -- 4.2.Environmental sustainability in a full world: values, concepts and policies -- 4.2.1.Environmentalism and sustainable development: world-views and values of nature in a full world -- 4.2.2.International environmental law and policy -- 4.2.2.1.Status, scope and sustainability relevance of multilateral environmental agreements -- 4.2.2.2.The biodiversity and climate change conventions -- 4.2.2.3.MEA implementation and issues of compliance, enforcement and effectiveness -- 4.2.3.Scientific concepts, criteria and interpretations of environmental sustainability --
  • Contents note continued: 4.2.3.1.Environmental and Earth system science for sustainability -- 4.2.3.2.Conceptual models and propositions of global environmental sustainability -- 4.2.3.3.Frameworks and metrics of global environmental sustainability -- 4.2.3.4.Resilience and vulnerability of natural and socio-ecological systems -- 4.3.Macro-assessment of global and large-scale environmental change -- 4.3.1.Overview of the state of the global environment -- 4.3.2.Major issues and inter-linkages -- 4.3.2.1.Climate change -- 4.3.2.2.Loss of species, biodiversity and ecosystem services -- 4.3.2.3.Emerging risks and issues -- 4.3.3.Sustainability implications of global environmental change -- 4.4.Environmental assessment and management approaches and applications -- 4.4.1.Environmental mainstreaming: need and tools -- 4.4.2.EAM tools and approaches to environmental safeguarding -- 4.4.2.1.Environmental impact assessment and strategic environmental assessment --
  • Contents note continued: 4.4.2.2.Cumulative effects assessment and management (CEAM) -- 4.4.2.3.Environmental risk assessment -- 4.4.2.4.Integrated environmental/ecosystem assessment -- 4.4.2.5.Environmental management regimes and systems -- 4.4.3.Environmental assessment and management tools and approaches for environmental sustainability assurance -- 4.4.3.1.Specifying demand- and supply-side principles for strong sustainability -- 4.4.3.2.Strengthening EIA and SEA and other EAM tools as sustainability instruments -- 4.4.3.3.Ecosystems approach to maintaining critical natural capital and services -- 4.5.Conclusion -- Notes -- 5.Economics-based approaches to sustainability appraisal -- 5.1.Introduction -- 5.2.Background: entry points for an economic approach to sustainability analysis -- 5.3.Sustainability -- 5.3.1.The term `sustainability' -- 5.3.2.Economic sustainability in a narrow sense -- 5.3.3.Economic sustainability as a dimension of sustainable development --
  • Contents note continued: 5.3.4.Sustainability as non-declining human welfare -- 5.3.4.1.Natural capital: weak and strong sustainability -- 5.3.4.2.Other types of capital -- 5.4.Economic applications of sustainability assessment -- 5.5.Approaches to integrating economic variables with social and environmental variables -- 5.5.1.Approaches to integration in the estimation of impacts -- 5.5.1.1.Scope of integration -- 5.5.1.2.Methodological approaches and challenges -- 5.5.1.3.Simple methods -- 5.5.1.4.Complex methods -- 5.6.Evaluation and comparison: integration of economic, environmental and social variables -- 5.6.1.Assessment of projects -- 5.6.2.Assessment of policy -- 5.6.3.Macro-economic performance -- 5.6.3.1.Adjusted savings -- 5.6.3.2.Trade and trans-boundary movements of capital -- 5.6.3.3.Addressing the social dimension of sustainable development -- 5.7.Emergence of the green economy concept -- 5.8.Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- Notes --
  • Contents note continued: 6.Social dimensions of sustainability appraisal -- 6.1.Introduction -- 6.2.Organising concepts, values and principles -- 6.2.1.Scope and interpretation of social sustainability -- 6.2.1.1.Basic needs and social well-being -- 6.2.1.2.Equity: basic needs plus what else? -- 6.2.1.3.Social inclusion -- 6.2.1.4.Social capital -- 6.2.1.5.Empowerment -- 6.2.1.6.Security and resilience -- 6.2.2.International law and policy -- 6.2.3.The implementation gap and the role of international agencies -- 6.2.4.National policy frameworks -- 6.3.Retrospective assessments of trends and issues: global and national social appraisals -- 6.4.Status of social appraisal: tools and approaches -- 6.4.1.Social impact assessment (SIA) -- 6.4.1.1.Scope and purpose of SIA -- 6.4.1.2.SIA principles and guidelines -- 6.4.1.3.Steps in SIA -- 6.4.1.4.Methods and data -- 6.4.1.5.Integration with other impact assessments and sustainability concepts -- 6.4.2.Health impact assessment (HIA) --
  • Contents note continued: 6.4.2.1.Sustainability values and guiding principles of HIA -- 6.4.2.2.HIA procedure and methodology -- 6.4.2.3.HIA application and good practice -- 6.4.3.Human Rights Impact Assessment (HRLA) -- 6.4.4.Indigenous peoples and cultural assessment -- 6.4.5.Sustainable livelihoods framework -- 6.5.World Bank social appraisal tools -- 6.5.1.Poverty assessments -- 6.5.2.Poverty and social impact analysis (PSIA) -- 6.5.3.Gender analysis -- 6.5.4.Indigenous peoples' development planning -- 6.5.5.Resettlement -- 6.6.Public participation in decision-making -- 6.6.1.Types of public participation -- 6.7.Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- Notes -- pt. 3 National and international experience to date -- 7.Experience in the European Union and selected developed countries -- 7.1.The European Union and Europe-wide agenda -- 7.1.1.Legal and policy framework -- 7.1.1.1.Sustainable development in EU primary law -- 7.1.1.2.EU sustainable development policy and strategy --
  • Contents note continued: 7.1.2.(Integrated) impact assessment -- 7.1.2.1.Cornerstones and elements of approach -- 7.1.2.2.Initial phase of implementation (2002--2005) -- 7.1.2.3.Recent changes in guidance and oversight (2006--2011) -- 7.1.2.4.A final word on impact assessment as a sustainability tool -- 7.1.3.EC-funded research projects and training on impact assessment -- 7.1.4.The European Environmental Agency -- 7.2.The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) -- 7.3.Selected national experiences -- 7.3.1.Australia -- 7.3.1.1.Legal and policy background -- 7.3.1.2.Integrated assessment at the Commonwealth level -- 7.3.1.3.Application at the state level: Western Australia -- 7.3.1.4.The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) -- 7.3.2.Canada -- 7.3.2.1.Legal and policy background -- 7.3.2.2.Role and approach of the National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy --
  • Contents note continued: 7.3.2.3.Experience with federal sustainable development strategies -- 7.3.2.4.Impact assessment -- 7.3.2.5.Land use and resource planning related approaches -- 7.3.3.The Netherlands -- 7.3.3.1.National-level assessment -- 7.3.3.2.Provincial-level assessment -- 7.3.3.3.Municipal-level assessment -- 7.3.3.4.General framework for SA -- 7.3.4.New Zealand -- 7.3.4.1.Legal and policy background -- 7.3.4.2.RMA practice -- 7.3.5.Switzerland -- 7.3.6.The United Kingdom -- 7.3.6.1.Policy-level appraisal -- 7.3.6.2.Assessment of plans and programmes -- 7.3.6.3.New planning framework in England -- 7.3.7.The USA -- 7.4.Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- Notes -- 8.Experience in selected development cooperation agencies and developing countries -- 8.1.Introduction -- 8.2.Multilateral agencies -- 8.2.1.The African Development Bank (AfDB) -- 8.2.2.The Asian Development Bank (ADB) -- 8.2.2.1.Country environmental analyses -- 8.2.2.2.Strategic environmental assessment --
  • Contents note continued: 8.2.2.3.Safeguard policy statement -- 8.2.2.4.Sustainability reports -- 8.2.2.5.Environment-cum-economic planning -- 8.2.3.The Inter-American Development Bank -- 8.2.4.The International Finance Corporation and the World Bank -- 8.3.Bilateral agencies -- 8.3.1.Australia: Ausaid -- 8.3.2.Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) -- 8.3.3.The Netherlands -- 8.3.4.The Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (NORAD) -- 8.3.5.The Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida) -- 8.4.UN organisations -- 8.4.1.UNEP -- 8.4.2.UNDP -- 8.4.3.Poverty--Environment Initiative -- 8.5.Developing countries -- 8.5.1.Southern Africa -- 8.5.1.1.Southern African views on sustainable development and approaches to sustainability appraisal -- 8.5.1.2.Rossing uranium mine sustainability assessment, Namibia -- 8.5.2.South Africa -- 8.5.2.1.Introduction -- 8.5.2.2.Government initiatives -- 8.5.2.3.Provincial and local-level initiatives --
  • Contents note continued: 8.5.2.4.Private sector initiatives -- 8.5.2.5.Cape Action Plan for the Environment -- 8.5.2.6.Human settlement policy framework -- 8.5.3.Some examples of experience in other developing countries -- 8.6.Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- Notes -- pt. 4 Sustainability appraisal methodologies and their application -- 9.Natural resources and land use -- 9.1.Introduction -- 9.2.Background on key concepts and approaches -- 9.2.1.Linking global environmental issues and human needs -- 9.2.2.Land evaluation and land use planning -- 9.2.3.Cross-cutting concepts and approaches -- 9.2.3.1.Analysing the resource wealth of the poor -- 9.3.Global assessment and analysis of natural resource issues and links -- 9.4.Food and water security as fundamental challenges -- 9.4.1.Global food assessment and response planning -- 9.4.2.Global assessments of water trends and issues -- 9.4.3.Regional and trans-boundary assessment --
  • Contents note continued: 9.4.4.National- and sub-national water assessment: an example from the Netherlands -- 9.4.5.Towards hydropower sustainability assessment -- 9.5.Sustainable agriculture -- 9.5.1.Trends and issues -- 9.5.2.Policy responses to the impact of intensive farming -- 9.5.2.1.European approaches to policy reform -- 9.5.2.2.Sustainability assessment of farms -- 9.5.2.3.Inquiry into the sustainability of intensive farming, New Zealand -- 9.5.3.Sustainable agriculture and rural development, standards and certification in developing countries -- 9.6.Sustainable forestry management -- 9.6.1.Global assessments and trends -- 9.6.2.Assessing sustainable forest management -- 9.6.3.Intensive, commercial forestry -- 9.6.3.1.Regional Forest Agreement (RFA) process, Australia -- 9.6.3.2.Tool for sustainability impact assessment of the Forest Wood Chain (ToSIA) -- 9.7.Sustainable fisheries management -- 9.7.1.Issues and trends in fisheries -- 9.7.2.Global assessments --
  • Contents note continued: 9.7.3.Fisheries certification -- 9.7.4.Sustainable fisheries assessment and management -- 9.7.4.1.Sustainable fisheries assessment: Australian practice -- 9.7.5.Aquaculture as a sustainability issue -- 9.7.5.1.Assessments and audits of the impact of salmon farming in British Columbia -- 9.8.Conclusion -- Notes -- 10.Sustainability appraisal for business, industry and infrastructure development -- 10.1.Introduction -- 10.2.Key concepts and drivers -- 10.3.Sustainability norms and principles for business and industry -- 10.3.1.Industry member forums -- 10.3.2.Norms and standards aimed at regulation of business and industry -- 10.4.Key tools and approaches -- 10.4.1.Sustainability reporting -- 10.4.2.Triple bottom line assessment -- 10.4.3.Life cycle analysis (LCA) -- 10.4.4.Environmental accounting -- 10.4.5.Environmental or sustainability audit -- 10.4.6.Sustainability-Integrated Guidelines for Management (SIGMA) -- 10.4.7.The Natural Step --
  • Contents note continued: 10.4.8.Sustainable Project Appraisal Routine (SPeAR) -- 10.4.9.Anglo American's Socio-Economic Assessment Toolbox (SEAT) -- 10.4.10.Environmental sustainability assessment -- 10.4.11.Corporate sustainability assessment: the case of Crystal Flash, Michigan -- 10.4.12.Bp's Sustainability Assessment Model (SAM) -- 10.4.13.Bank Sarasin: sustainability assessment for investment -- 10.4.14.Dow Jones sustainability indexes and corporate sustainability assessments -- 10.4.15.UK Government: sustainability assessment of renewable energy projects -- 10.4.16.Sustainability assessment for small and medium-sized enterprises -- 10.5.Sectoral review processes -- 10.5.1.The Sustainable Paper Cycle Study -- 10.5.2.The Mining, Minerals and Sustainable Development (MMSD) project -- 10.5.3.Extractive Industries Review: a sustainability appraisal by any other name? -- 10.5.3.1.The EIR process: did it satisfy the requirements of a sustainability appraisal? --
  • Contents note continued: 10.5.4.World Commission on Dams: performance assessment of large dams -- 10.6.Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- Notes -- 11.Sustainable urban development -- 11.1.Introduction -- 11.2.Background: conceptual and policy frameworks -- 11.2.1.Urban growth in the developing and developed worlds -- 11.2.2.Some basic terms and concepts -- 11.2.3.Urban sustainability policies and strategies -- 11.2.3.1.Global policy agenda -- 11.2.3.2.EU strategies and policies -- 11.2.3.3.Development cooperation agency policies -- 11.2.3.4.National and state approaches -- 11.2.3.5.Local Agenda 21's and municipal activities -- 11.3.Global and comparative assessments of sustainability-related urban trends and conditions -- 11.3.1.Global dynamics and impacts of urban expansion -- 11.3.2.Cities as the new frontier in the struggle for sustainability -- 11.3.2.1.Cities in a Globalising World; Global Report on Human Settlements (2001) (UN-Habitat 2001) --
  • Contents note continued: 11.3.2.2.The Challenge of Slums; Global Report on Human Settlements (2003) (UN-Habitat 2003a) -- 11.3.2.3.State of the World's Cities Report, 2008--2009: Harmonious Cities (UN-Habitat 2008) -- 11.3.2.4.State of the World's Cities Report, 2010--11: Bridging the Urban Divide (2010) (UN-Habitat 2010) -- 11.3.2.5.State of the World's Cities Report, 2012--2013: Prosperity of Cities (UN-Habitat 2012) -- 11.3.3.Comparative rating of cities -- 11.3.3.1.Global ratings of liveable and hardship cities -- 11.3.3.2.National surveys -- 11.4.Assessing the external impacts of cities -- 11.4.1.Regional and peri-urban effects -- 11.4.1.1.Developing country issues and approaches -- 11.4.1.2.Developed country issues and approaches -- 11.4.2.Urban ecological footprints and resource metabolism -- 11.5.City and municipal-level approaches -- 11.5.1.Providing information, awareness-raising and toolkit approaches -- 11.5.2.Municipal sustainability assessment --
  • Contents note continued: 11.5.3.Approaches focusing on the built environment -- 11.5.3.1.Sustainability appraisal applied to government estates -- 11.5.4.Questionnaire, checklist and matrix approaches -- 11.5.5.Municipal environmental budgeting -- 11.6.Local and community-based planning initiatives to move towards sustainability -- 11.6.1.Citizen-based assessment -- 11.6.2.Campus sustainability assessments -- 11.6.3.Home sustainability assessment -- 11.7.Urban development and climate change -- 11.8.Conclusion -- Acknowledgement -- Notes -- 12.Trade liberalisation policies and sustainability measures -- 12.1.Introduction -- 12.2.Background on the international trade regime with particular reference to environment and sustainable development -- 12.2.1.The multilateral trade regime -- 12.2.2.Regional and bilateral free trade agreements -- 12.3.Current practice in SIA of trade policies -- 12.3.1.International organisations --
  • Contents note continued: 12.3.1.1.The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) -- 12.3.1.2.The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) -- 12.3.1.3.The Organisation of American States (OAS) -- 12.3.1.4.World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) -- 12.3.2.Other trade-related institutional initiatives -- 12.3.2.1.United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) -- 12.3.2.2.International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) -- 12.3.2.3.International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD) -- 12.3.3.National and supra-national approaches -- 12.3.3.1.The Canadian and US experience -- 12.3.3.2.North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation (NACEC) -- 12.3.3.3.The European Commission (EC) -- 12.3.4.Other approaches -- 12.4.Common elements and differences in the major approaches to trade SIA -- 12.4.1.Coverage of the environmental, social and economic dimensions of sustainable development -- 12.4.2.Coverage of trade measures --
  • Contents note continued: 12.4.3.Geographical coverage -- 12.4.4.Assessment procedures -- 12.4.5.Stakeholder participation and consultation -- 12.4.6.Timing -- 12.4.7.Scenarios -- 12.4.8.Assessment and valuation tools -- 12.4.9.Indicators -- 12.4.10.Significance criteria -- 12.5.Conclusion -- Acknowledgement -- Notes -- pt. 5 Where to from here? -- 13.Retrospect and prospect -- 13.1.The evolving agenda of sustainable development -- 13.1.1.A reality check: has development become more sustainable in practice? -- 13.1.2.A horizon check: what emerging trends challenge our current approach to sustainable development? -- 13.1.3.A strategy check: where should we now be focusing our energies in the `new era of challenges for sustainable development'? -- 13.2.The anatomy of sustainability appraisal: some concluding observations and second thoughts -- 13.2.1.How far have we progressed with sustainability appraisal? -- 13.2.2.Where do we go from here in process and practice? --
  • Contents note continued: 13.2.3.Building on what we have: some ways forward and some unresolved questions -- 13.2.4.Sustainability appraisal framework revisited -- Acknowledgement -- Notes
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
xlii, 810 pages:
Isbn
9781844073573
Isbn Type
(hardback : alk. paper)
Lccn
2013025673
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
  • (OCoLC)853664412
  • 2123775
  • (OCoLC)853664412
  • (OCoLC)ocn853664412
  • 2123775

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